Miffa Chan


The 22 Non Mutable Laws of Selling Carrots: # 7 The Ladder
January 4, 2007, 12:44 pm
Filed under: Marketing
The law is about AVIS and his effort to compite Hertz.
Look how Father Bunny was taking care of out Holden (an Avis car)

The Law of the Ladder tells us that in most market categories (or markets) , there is actually more than one available slot in the mind of the customer and besides that an Hierarchy of Categories that must be observed.

Certainly this law is clearer when you refer to big categories and it dilutes when you deep down the sub categories and niches.

Once again consumer perception and his ability to retain information (sometime his will to retain it) must be observed. Research indicates that humans –unlike bunnies- can only retain three (maximum seven) concepts at the same time.

How many carrot juice brands can you mention?

More important is that –according to them- one must observe his position in the ladder and design a strategy according to this position.

A practical exercise (but a bit complex): Luxury sedans (cars).

Mercedes, BMW, audi (70%) in Europe. No French car maker in the row (Renault, Peugeot, Citröen).

No French car maker has succeeded in placing one of their models in the premium segment. Poor design, poor engineering, lack of tradition? May be.

But sometimes they tried to approach the problem as if they were on top of the ladder and tried to compete directly with German brands.



The 22 Non Mutable Laws of Selling Carrots: # 7 The Ladder
January 4, 2007, 12:44 pm
Filed under: Marketing
The law is about AVIS and his effort to compite Hertz.
Look how Father Bunny was taking care of out Holden (an Avis car)

The Law of the Ladder tells us that in most market categories (or markets) , there is actually more than one available slot in the mind of the customer and besides that an Hierarchy of Categories that must be observed.

Certainly this law is clearer when you refer to big categories and it dilutes when you deep down the sub categories and niches.

Once again consumer perception and his ability to retain information (sometime his will to retain it) must be observed. Research indicates that humans –unlike bunnies- can only retain three (maximum seven) concepts at the same time.

How many carrot juice brands can you mention?

More important is that –according to them- one must observe his position in the ladder and design a strategy according to this position.

A practical exercise (but a bit complex): Luxury sedans (cars).

Mercedes, BMW, audi (70%) in Europe. No French car maker in the row (Renault, Peugeot, Citröen).

No French car maker has succeeded in placing one of their models in the premium segment. Poor design, poor engineering, lack of tradition? May be.

But sometimes they tried to approach the problem as if they were on top of the ladder and tried to compete directly with German brands.



The 22 Non Mutable Laws of Selling Carrots: # 6 Exclusivity (Pink Bunnies fight)
December 12, 2006, 9:32 am
Filed under: Marketing

I must admit that I have the feeling that my assignment was truly unfair. This book is a bestseller in the “art of selling carrots category” but sometimes it looks like a silly – but funny- exercise to get some money. Some people even think that for an obscure reason the authors wanted exactly 22 and they added some scam to the lot.

Law 6 says “Two companies cannot own the same word in the prospect’s mind” When a competitor owns a word or position in the prospect’s mind, it is futile to attempt to own the same word.

What I like about this chapter is that bunnies take a principal role on it. Duracell and Energizer have fought for the word “long lasting” for decades. I must admit that if you do business in the batteries market this is the only word (at least the best one) to own in the prospects mind.

In more complex markets this is not easy. Sometime there’s no clear leader with a clear positioning and trying to conquer its position could be a nice move.

But who is the idiot in energizer that used the same pink bunny?

Anyways this is just as easy as the old advice “ if you cannot be the best, at least try to be the only one”



The 22 Non Mutable Laws of Selling Carrots: # 6 Exclusivity (Pink Bunnies fight)
December 12, 2006, 9:32 am
Filed under: Marketing

I must admit that I have the feeling that my assignment was truly unfair. This book is a bestseller in the “art of selling carrots category” but sometimes it looks like a silly – but funny- exercise to get some money. Some people even think that for an obscure reason the authors wanted exactly 22 and they added some scam to the lot.

Law 6 says “Two companies cannot own the same word in the prospect’s mind” When a competitor owns a word or position in the prospect’s mind, it is futile to attempt to own the same word.

What I like about this chapter is that bunnies take a principal role on it. Duracell and Energizer have fought for the word “long lasting” for decades. I must admit that if you do business in the batteries market this is the only word (at least the best one) to own in the prospects mind.

In more complex markets this is not easy. Sometime there’s no clear leader with a clear positioning and trying to conquer its position could be a nice move.

But who is the idiot in energizer that used the same pink bunny?

Anyways this is just as easy as the old advice “ if you cannot be the best, at least try to be the only one”



The 22 Non Mutable Laws of Selling Carrots: # 5 Focus
December 1, 2006, 11:26 am
Filed under: Marketing
Sometimes breaking the law is a good move !
This is one of my favourites, but I really screwed it up a little bit. Focus regarding carrots means “do not put more carrots in your mouth that the amount you can’t actually chew”

What Mr Trucha and partners originally said it was: “The most powerful concept in marketing is owning a word in the prospect’s mind”.

Easy? Here it is the opinion of Alain Duffou – Alain is an executive who works for one big French company – I love to talk with French people over the phone because his funny and cheerful accent speaking English is unbeatable as their efforts to sell luxury cars.

“I can’t help but to think that this book has overly simplified thinking”

I totally agree about that. If you think that managing markets and consumers can be reduced to 22 laws you would need to buy the bestseller “How to win a million dollar in Las Vegas with no effort”

Ehemm… About the law itself. You must conquer a piece of your customers (prospects) minds with a word or concept powerful enough to describe your activity and aim.

Fresher taste ™ is a good choice. I would prefer Miffa’s own ™ (but FB told me I am not a TV star and I have no “share of mind”



The 22 Non Mutable Laws of Selling Carrots: # 5 Focus
December 1, 2006, 11:26 am
Filed under: Marketing
Sometimes breaking the law is a good move !
This is one of my favourites, but I really screwed it up a little bit. Focus regarding carrots means “do not put more carrots in your mouth that the amount you can’t actually chew”

What Mr Trucha and partners originally said it was: “The most powerful concept in marketing is owning a word in the prospect’s mind”.

Easy? Here it is the opinion of Alain Duffou – Alain is an executive who works for one big French company – I love to talk with French people over the phone because his funny and cheerful accent speaking English is unbeatable as their efforts to sell luxury cars.

“I can’t help but to think that this book has overly simplified thinking”

I totally agree about that. If you think that managing markets and consumers can be reduced to 22 laws you would need to buy the bestseller “How to win a million dollar in Las Vegas with no effort”

Ehemm… About the law itself. You must conquer a piece of your customers (prospects) minds with a word or concept powerful enough to describe your activity and aim.

Fresher taste ™ is a good choice. I would prefer Miffa’s own ™ (but FB told me I am not a TV star and I have no “share of mind”



The 22 Non Mutable Laws of Selling Carrots: Law 4 Perception
November 29, 2006, 7:07 pm
Filed under: Marketing

The art of selling carrots is not a battle about carrots themselves, is a battle about the
consumer perception of you carrots.

If you want to be into this business: this is the law. (Not “the law” judge Dred was promoting).

It means: “there are no better products than others; it’s just a feeling from the consumer or relatives that told him that A is better than B. Are they working for a certification company? Sure they’re not.

But if the consumer perception is high enough, you will be able to sell rotten carrots as the fresher ones.

PD: This is not a move that we approve, but if you work for Marina D’or or any real state is a nice rule to learn.