Miffa Chan


The 22 Non Mutable Laws of Selling Carrots: # 6 Exclusivity (Pink Bunnies fight)
December 12, 2006, 9:32 am
Filed under: Marketing

I must admit that I have the feeling that my assignment was truly unfair. This book is a bestseller in the “art of selling carrots category” but sometimes it looks like a silly – but funny- exercise to get some money. Some people even think that for an obscure reason the authors wanted exactly 22 and they added some scam to the lot.

Law 6 says “Two companies cannot own the same word in the prospect’s mind” When a competitor owns a word or position in the prospect’s mind, it is futile to attempt to own the same word.

What I like about this chapter is that bunnies take a principal role on it. Duracell and Energizer have fought for the word “long lasting” for decades. I must admit that if you do business in the batteries market this is the only word (at least the best one) to own in the prospects mind.

In more complex markets this is not easy. Sometime there’s no clear leader with a clear positioning and trying to conquer its position could be a nice move.

But who is the idiot in energizer that used the same pink bunny?

Anyways this is just as easy as the old advice “ if you cannot be the best, at least try to be the only one”



The 22 Non Mutable Laws of Selling Carrots: # 5 Focus
December 1, 2006, 11:26 am
Filed under: Marketing
Sometimes breaking the law is a good move !
This is one of my favourites, but I really screwed it up a little bit. Focus regarding carrots means “do not put more carrots in your mouth that the amount you can’t actually chew”

What Mr Trucha and partners originally said it was: “The most powerful concept in marketing is owning a word in the prospect’s mind”.

Easy? Here it is the opinion of Alain Duffou – Alain is an executive who works for one big French company – I love to talk with French people over the phone because his funny and cheerful accent speaking English is unbeatable as their efforts to sell luxury cars.

“I can’t help but to think that this book has overly simplified thinking”

I totally agree about that. If you think that managing markets and consumers can be reduced to 22 laws you would need to buy the bestseller “How to win a million dollar in Las Vegas with no effort”

Ehemm… About the law itself. You must conquer a piece of your customers (prospects) minds with a word or concept powerful enough to describe your activity and aim.

Fresher taste ™ is a good choice. I would prefer Miffa’s own ™ (but FB told me I am not a TV star and I have no “share of mind”



The 22 Non Mutable Laws of Selling Carrots: # 5 Focus
December 1, 2006, 11:26 am
Filed under: Marketing
Sometimes breaking the law is a good move !
This is one of my favourites, but I really screwed it up a little bit. Focus regarding carrots means “do not put more carrots in your mouth that the amount you can’t actually chew”

What Mr Trucha and partners originally said it was: “The most powerful concept in marketing is owning a word in the prospect’s mind”.

Easy? Here it is the opinion of Alain Duffou – Alain is an executive who works for one big French company – I love to talk with French people over the phone because his funny and cheerful accent speaking English is unbeatable as their efforts to sell luxury cars.

“I can’t help but to think that this book has overly simplified thinking”

I totally agree about that. If you think that managing markets and consumers can be reduced to 22 laws you would need to buy the bestseller “How to win a million dollar in Las Vegas with no effort”

Ehemm… About the law itself. You must conquer a piece of your customers (prospects) minds with a word or concept powerful enough to describe your activity and aim.

Fresher taste ™ is a good choice. I would prefer Miffa’s own ™ (but FB told me I am not a TV star and I have no “share of mind”



The 22 Non Mutable Laws of Selling Carrots: Law 4 Perception
November 29, 2006, 7:07 pm
Filed under: Marketing

The art of selling carrots is not a battle about carrots themselves, is a battle about the
consumer perception of you carrots.

If you want to be into this business: this is the law. (Not “the law” judge Dred was promoting).

It means: “there are no better products than others; it’s just a feeling from the consumer or relatives that told him that A is better than B. Are they working for a certification company? Sure they’re not.

But if the consumer perception is high enough, you will be able to sell rotten carrots as the fresher ones.

PD: This is not a move that we approve, but if you work for Marina D’or or any real state is a nice rule to learn.



The 22 Non Mutable Laws of Selling Carrots: Law 4 Perception
November 29, 2006, 7:07 pm
Filed under: Marketing

The art of selling carrots is not a battle about carrots themselves, is a battle about the
consumer perception of you carrots.

If you want to be into this business: this is the law. (Not “the law” judge Dred was promoting).

It means: “there are no better products than others; it’s just a feeling from the consumer or relatives that told him that A is better than B. Are they working for a certification company? Sure they’re not.

But if the consumer perception is high enough, you will be able to sell rotten carrots as the fresher ones.

PD: This is not a move that we approve, but if you work for Marina D’or or any real state is a nice rule to learn.



Ads or no ads: Consumer behaviour and Cognitive Dissonance
November 24, 2006, 12:09 pm
Filed under: consumer behaviour, Marketing
What the hell I am doing here in this Holden if I could be in a mint green Rolls?

Today my assignment was to explain one of the most powerful non mutable laws (for those that emailed me telling that is immutable, I would like to say that I do not care about Al Laughing and Jack “Trucha” book and my laws are “non mutable”)

This is the law of perception. But I will write about it another day.

Today I would really like to share with you one of the most amazing behaviours that I have discovered in humans: Cognitive Dissonance (Disonancia Cognoscitiva in Spanish).

I noticed it for the first time when I bought my first Aston Martin. Prior to make my decision of buying this car I had a decision set (a bunch of cars to choose from) that included a 911. Of course the 911 has not the class and old British heritage (don’t forget I am from HK) but sure the engineering and technology was much better.

I noticed than many Porsche users want a sport car like the 911 but are concerned about the utility of a tiny, two seats, expensive, uncomfortable, too aggressive and attractive. Further when male humans grew up tends to accumulate fat reserves around his floating area that severely impair them to enter inside the cockpit and getting out of the car habitacle.

Porsche made a superb movement when they decided to built the Cayenne jointly with VW. A genuine Porsche with everything a 911 could offer but minimizing the “Have I taken the right decision?” effect.

Many Sport cars buyers and luxury goods buyers suffer from dissonance. This is a term used to describe a mental state of discomfort that one suffers when he or she thinks that evidences that a decision or behaviour is wrong.

There are several ways to cope with. The Miffa’s way: “Vertu or Nokia? No problem. I take both of them, so the dissonance disappears.”

Professor bunnies from all over the world study this phenomena since late fifties since dissonance is a sever obstacle to making right decisions in business.

Please little rabbits do take this matter seriously, Dissonance happens!!.



Ads or no ads: Consumer behaviour and Cognitive Dissonance
November 24, 2006, 12:09 pm
Filed under: consumer behaviour, Marketing
What the hell I am doing here in this Holden if I could be in a mint green Rolls?

Today my assignment was to explain one of the most powerful non mutable laws (for those that emailed me telling that is immutable, I would like to say that I do not care about Al Laughing and Jack “Trucha” book and my laws are “non mutable”)

This is the law of perception. But I will write about it another day.

Today I would really like to share with you one of the most amazing behaviours that I have discovered in humans: Cognitive Dissonance (Disonancia Cognoscitiva in Spanish).

I noticed it for the first time when I bought my first Aston Martin. Prior to make my decision of buying this car I had a decision set (a bunch of cars to choose from) that included a 911. Of course the 911 has not the class and old British heritage (don’t forget I am from HK) but sure the engineering and technology was much better.

I noticed than many Porsche users want a sport car like the 911 but are concerned about the utility of a tiny, two seats, expensive, uncomfortable, too aggressive and attractive. Further when male humans grew up tends to accumulate fat reserves around his floating area that severely impair them to enter inside the cockpit and getting out of the car habitacle.

Porsche made a superb movement when they decided to built the Cayenne jointly with VW. A genuine Porsche with everything a 911 could offer but minimizing the “Have I taken the right decision?” effect.

Many Sport cars buyers and luxury goods buyers suffer from dissonance. This is a term used to describe a mental state of discomfort that one suffers when he or she thinks that evidences that a decision or behaviour is wrong.

There are several ways to cope with. The Miffa’s way: “Vertu or Nokia? No problem. I take both of them, so the dissonance disappears.”

Professor bunnies from all over the world study this phenomena since late fifties since dissonance is a sever obstacle to making right decisions in business.

Please little rabbits do take this matter seriously, Dissonance happens!!.



The 22 Non Mutable Laws of Selling Carrots: Law 3 Mind
November 23, 2006, 12:18 pm
Filed under: Marketing
Did you blog from Egypt Miffa? Way much better that those who blog having beer in crowded bars.

It’s not important to be the first in the market but the first in the mind of consumers.

Preamble: After so many attacks we have received after our 22 Non Mutable Laws Series Me and FB have gotten more mad in our aim to complete the whole 22. I will discuss this in another post but bear in mind that FB was a little bit upset about people calling him nasty things.

This law is simple but it may interfere with the first one when you analyze it isolated. Perception is very important (and there’s a law devoted to it) and if you capture the mind of the consumer and he or she really thinks your carrots are the fresher ones there’s nothing a better carrot breeder can do about that.

Exercise one: Please write down

– Which is the first blog published by a litlle bunny you have read?
– In the category of Little bunny blogger which one is your favourite?
– Think bunny. Who is the new bunny sensation?



The 22 Non Mutable Laws of Selling Carrots: Law 3 Mind
November 23, 2006, 12:18 pm
Filed under: Marketing
Did you blog from Egypt Miffa? Way much better that those who blog having beer in crowded bars.

It’s not important to be the first in the market but the first in the mind of consumers.

Preamble: After so many attacks we have received after our 22 Non Mutable Laws Series Me and FB have gotten more mad in our aim to complete the whole 22. I will discuss this in another post but bear in mind that FB was a little bit upset about people calling him nasty things.

This law is simple but it may interfere with the first one when you analyze it isolated. Perception is very important (and there’s a law devoted to it) and if you capture the mind of the consumer and he or she really thinks your carrots are the fresher ones there’s nothing a better carrot breeder can do about that.

Exercise one: Please write down

– Which is the first blog published by a litlle bunny you have read?
– In the category of Little bunny blogger which one is your favourite?
– Think bunny. Who is the new bunny sensation?



The 22 Non Mutable Laws of Selling Carrots: Law 2 Category
November 22, 2006, 5:00 pm
Filed under: Marketing
C’on Miffa you don’t need glasses!

WTF! I thought the art of selling carrots was a complicate one, but now I’ve changed my mind. This is just a matter of rabbit sense. So here it’s chapter two: The Category Law

If you can’t be first in a category, set up a new category you can be first in.

Given that it’s very hard to gain leadership in a category where competition already exists, (you have nothing to do as a blog star or a superhero) it’s better to create a product in new category than trying to attack existing categories.

If your supermarket offers you florette salads at a price a fancy restaurant would be able to match, something is wrong, or may be it’s not. They have done their homework and they did create a new category – the ready to make for lazy bastards lettuce – said a tired and really fucked up Father Bunny.

Category doesn’t have to be radically different, e.g. if there’s dominant player in soda drinks one can become the first to launch energetic drinks

If one can’t be the first to produce genetically altered carrots, one can still be the first to do the most bizarre things with them- Said Miffa Chan